Warrior Women

So I just realized I never posted the cover (click the image below for a larger version of the cover; art by the fabulous Julie Dillon) or contents of Warrior Women and now wanted to mention the starred Publishers Weekly review. So, first things first:

Warrior-200Warrior Women, edited by Paula Guran

From fantastic legends and science fictional futures come compelling tales of powerful women—or those who discover strength they did not know they possessed—who fight because they must, for what they believe in, for those they love, to simply survive, or who glory in battle itself. Fierce or fearful, they are courageous and honorable—occasionally unscrupulous and tainted—but all warriors worthy of the name.

Content (alphabetical by author last name):
• “They Tell Me There Will be No Pain” by Rachel Acks
• “Love Among the Talus” by Elizabeth Bear
• “The Days of the War, as Red as Blood, as Dark as Bile” by Aliette de Bodard
• “Anukazi’s Daughter” by Mary Gentle
• “England Under the White Witch” by Theodora Goss
• “Soul Case” by Nalo Hopkinson
• “Not That Kind of War” by Tanya Huff
• “Wonder Maul Doll” by Kameron Hurley
• “Joenna’s Ax” by Elaine Isaak
• “The Sea Troll’s Daughter” by Caitlín R. Kiernan
• “Eaters” by Nancy Kress
• “Northern Chess” by Tanith Lee
• “The Knight of Chains, The Deuce of Stars” by Yoon Ha Lee
• “In the Loop” by Ken Liu
• “Dying With Her Cheer Pants On” by Seanan McGuire
• “The Lonely Songs of Laren Dorr” by George R. R. Martin
• “Naratha’s Shadow” by Sharon Lee & Steve Miller
• “Hand to Hand” by Elizabeth Moon
• “And Wash Out by Tides of War” by An Owomoyela
• “Prayer” by Robert Reed
• “The Application of Hope” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
• “Boy Twelve” by Jessica Reisman
• “The Girls From Avenger” by Carrie Vaughn
• “Become a Warrior” by Jane Yolen

Now, for the review…

Publishers Weekly Starred Review:

Two dozen stories of women warriors form this epic anthology of stories about those forced to fight, those who chose to fight regardless of odds, those who ran from their destiny as warriors, and those who will end war at any cost. In Caitlín R. Kiernan’s “The Sea Troll’s Daughter,” the titular daughter of a fearsome beast reluctantly confronts the woman who slew her father. In Carrie Vaughn’s nonspeculative “The Girls from Avenger,” a WWII pilot tries to determine the cause of her friend’s mysterious crash. An immortal wandering warrior meets an immortal prisoner in George R.R. Martin’s hopeful but bleak “The Lonely Songs of Laren Dorr.” Spaceship captain Tory Sabin must battle bureaucracy and physics to locate a missing friend in “The Application of Hope” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch. The warriors include girls as well as grown women: young Thien Bao is offered the chance to end a cataclysmic war at an unimaginable cost in Aliette de Bodard’s “The Days of the War, as Red as Blood, as Dark as Bile,” and a girl who discovers her father is a “monster” grows into a woman who tries to save others from his fate in Ken Liu’s “In the Loop.” Each story contains strength and compassion, even when the personal cost is high. The depictions of battle and trauma are rarely graphic, but they’re as hard-hitting as the subject demands. This is a truly impressive accomplishment for Guran and her contributors.

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