BLOOD SISTERS Now Available

bloodsiscoverBlood Sisters: Vampire Stories by Women
Edited by Paula Guran
Paperback: 448 pages
Publisher: Night Shade Books (May 5, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1597808180
ISBN-13: 978-1597808187

Bram Stoker was hardly the first author—male or female—to fictionalize the folkloric vampire, but he defined the modern iconic vampire when Dracula appeared in 1897. Since then, many have reinterpreted the ever-versatile vampire over and over again—and female writers have played vital roles in proving that the vampire, as well as our perpetual fascination with it, is truly immortal…

And the first review I’ve seen: Beauty in Ruins.

Contents (in alphabetical order by author):

• Kelley Armstrong, “Learning Curve”
• Elizabeth Bear, “Needles”
• Holly Black, “The Coldest Girl in Coldtown”
• Pat Cadigan, “The Power and the Passion”
• Suzy McKee Charnas, “Unicorn Tapestry”
• Nancy A. Collins, “Vampire King of the Goth Chicks”
• Storm Constantine, “Where the Vampires Live”
• Jewelle Gomez, “October 1927”
• Laurell K. Hamilton, “Selling Houses”
• Lisa L. Hannett, “From the Teeth of Strange Children”
• Charlaine Harris, “Tacky”
• Nancy Holder, “Blood Freak”
• Nalo Hopkinson, “Greedy Choke Puppy”
• Tanya Huff, “This Town Ain’t Big Enough”
• Caitlín R. Kiernan, “Shipwrecks Above”
• Nancy Kilpatrick, “In Memory of…”
• Tanith Lee, “La Dame”
• Angela Slatter, “Sun Falls”
• Lucy Snyder, “Magdala Amygdala
• Hannah Strom-Martin, “Father Peña’s Last Dance”
• Melanie Tem, “The Better Half”
• Catherynne M. Valente, “In the Future When All’s Well”
• Carrie Vaughn, “A Princess of Spain”
• Freda Warringron, “The Fall of the House of Blackwater”
• Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, “Renewal”

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ToC The Mammoth Book of the Mummy

mummy_19300_md

THE MAMMOTH BOOK OF THE MUMMY
Publisher: Constable-Robinson (ISBN: 978-1472120298) 11 February 2016 (UK)
Running Press (ISBN-13: 978-0762457953) 28 July 28 2016 (UK)

The Mummy Lives!

Our endless fascination with the past is based not only on the impressive remains of ancient monuments and temples, but with the care many cultures—most notably the Egyptian, but others too—devoted to immortalizing their dead. Gazing upon faces of those who died centuries ago—sometimes preserved by accident rather than intent—and experience a wide range of emotion. These enigmatic remains of humanity have inspired creators since the early nineteenth century; literature, film, television, games, and graphic stories all reflect their imaginings. The Mammoth Book of the Mummy presents tales written for the twenty-first century and a few brand-new stories. Some delve into the past, others explore alternative histories, and some bring mummies into our own world. Gasp, sigh, shudder, smile, and occasionally giggle at the magic wrought by these authors who all make the mummy live again.

Contents
The Mammoth Book of the Mummy
25 Tales of the Immortalized Dead

Alphabetical by Author (* indicates original story)

  • Kage Baker, “The Queen in Yellow”
  • Gail Carriger, “The Curious Case of the Werewolf That Wasn’t, the Mummy That Was, and the Cat in the Jar”
  • Paul Cornell, “Ramesses on the Frontier”
  • Terry Dowling, “The Shaddowes Box”
  • Carole Nelson Douglas, “Fruit of the Tomb”
  • Steve Duffy, “The Night Comes On”
  • Karen Joy Fowler, “Private Grave 9”
  • Will Hill, “Three Memories of Death”
  • *Stephen Graham Jones, “American Mummy”
  • John Langan, “On Skua Island”
  • Joe R. Lansdale, “Bubba-Ho-Tep”
  • *Helen Marshall, “The Embalmer”
  • Kim Newman, “Egyptian Avenue”
  • Norman Partridge, “The Mummy’s Heart”
  • Adam Roberts, “Tollund”
  • Robert Sharp, “The Good Shabti”
  • *Anglea Slatter, “Egyptian Revival”
  • Keith Taylor, “The Emerald Scarab”
  • Lois Tilton & Noreen Doyle, “The Chapter of Coming Forth by Night”
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ToC for YEAR’S BEST DARK FANTASY & HORROR (finally)

YBDFH2015

UPDATE (4 Apr 1014): This is the final cover

No matter your expectations, the dark is full of the unknown: grim futures, distorted pasts, invasions of the uncanny, paranormal fancies, weird dreams, unnerving nightmares, baffling enigmas, revelatory excursions, desperate adventures, spectral journeys, mundane terrors, and supernatural visions. You may stumble into obsession—or find redemption. Often disturbing, occasionally delightful, let The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror be your annual guide through the mysteries and wonders of dark fiction.

Content (in alphabetical order by author)

  • Kelley Armstrong, “The Screams of Dragons” (Subterranean Press Magazine, Spring 2014)
  • Dale Bailey, “The End of the End of Everything” by Dale Bailey (Tor.com, 23 Apr 2014)
  • Laird Barron, “(Little Miss) Queen of Darkness” (Dark Discoveries #29)
  • Elizabeth Bear “Madam Damnable’s Sewing Circle” (Dead Man’s Hand, ed. John Joseph Adams)
  • Richard Bowes, “Sleep Walking Now and Then” (Tor.com, 9 July 2014)
  • Nadia Bulkin, “Only Unity Saves the Damned” (Letters to Lovecraft, ed. Jesse Bullington)
  • Gemma Files, “A Wish From a Bone” (Fearful Symmetries, ed. Ellen Datlow)
  • S. L. Gilbow, “Mr Hill’s Death” (The Dark #4)
  • Lisa L. Hannett & Angela Slatter, “The Female Factory” (The Female Factory)
  • Maria Dahvana Headley “Who Is Your Executioner?” (Nightmare Magazine, Nov 2014)
  • Stephen Graham Jones, “The Elvis Room” (The Elvis Room)
  • Caitlín R. Kiernan, “The Cats of River Street (1925)” (Sirenia Digest #102)
  • Alice Sola Kim, “Mothers, Lock Up Your Daughters Because They Are Terrifying” (Monstrous Affections, eds. Kelly Link & Gavin Grant/Tin House #61)
  • John Langan, “Children of the Fang” (Lovecraft’s Monsters, ed. Ellen Datlow)
  • Yoon Ha Lee, “Combustion Hour” (Tor.com, 10 Apr 2014)
  • V. H. Leslie, “The Quiet Room” (Shadows & Tall Trees: 2014, ed. Michael Kelly)
  • Ken Liu, “Running Shoes” (SQ Mag, Issue 16, Sept 2014)
  • Usman T. Malik, “Resurrection Points” (Strange Horizons, 4 August 2014)
  • Helen Marshall, “Death and the Girl from Pi Delta Zeta” (Lackington’s, Issue 1, Winter 2014)/li>
  • Brandon Sanderson, “Dreamer” (Games Creatures Play, eds. Charlaine Harris & Toni L. P. Kelner)
  • Simon Strantzas, “Emotional Dues” (Burnt Black Suns)
  • Steve Rasnic Tem, “The Still, Cold Air” (Here with the Shadows)
  • Lavie Tidhar, “Kur-A-Len” (Black Gods Kiss)
  • Jeff VanderMeer, “Fragments from the Notes of a Dead Mycologist” (Shimmer #18)
  • Kali Wallace, “Water in Springtime” (Clarkesworld, Issue 91, Apr 2014)
  • Damien Angelica Walters, “The Floating Girls: A Documentary” (Jamais Vu Issue Three, Sept 2014)
  • Kaaron Warren, “The Nursery Corner” (Fearsome Magics, ed. Jonathan Strahan)
  • A. C. Wise, “And the Carnival Leaves Town” (Nightmare Carnival, ed. Ellen Datlow)
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Mermaids & Other Mysteries of the Deep: TOC & Cover

MERMAIDS-200The sea is full of mysteries and rivers shelter the unknown. Dating back to ancient Assyria, folkloric tales of mermaids, sirens, rusalki, nymphs, selkies, and other seafolk are found in many cultures, including those of Europe, Africa, the Near East and Asia. Dangerous or benevolent, seductive or sinister – modern masters of fantasy continue to create new legends of these creatures that enchant and entertain us more than ever. Gathered here are some of the finest of these stories. Immerse yourself in this wonderful—and sometimes wicked—watery world!

CONTENTS

Elizabeth Bear Bear • Swell
Samuel R. Delany • Driftglass
Neil Gaiman • The Sea Change
Delia Sherman • Miss Carstairs and the Merman
Margo Lanagan • Sea-Hearts
Christopher Barzak • The Drowned Mermaid
Genevieve Valentine • Abyssus Abyssum Invocat
Seanan McGuire • Each to Each
Sarah Monette • Somewhere Beneath Those Waves Was Her Home
Peter S. Beagle • Salt Wine
Caitlín R. Kiernan • The Mermaid of the Concrete Ocean
Amanda Downum • Flotsam
Cat Rambo • The Mermaids Singing Each to Each
Anna Taborska • Rusalka3
Chris Howard • The Mermaid Game
Gene Wolfe • The Nebraskan and the Nereid
Angela Slatter • A Good Husband
A. C. Wise • Letters to a Body on the Cusp of Drowning
Jane Yolen • The Corridors of the Sea
Lisa L. Hannett • Forever, Miss Tapekwa County
Catherynne M. Valente • Urchins, While Swimming
Tanith Lee • Magritte’s Secret Agent

[Read the introduction here.]

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New Cthulhu 2: More Recent Weird TOC & Cover

NEWCTHULU2-200Many of the best weird fiction writers (and creators in most other media) have been profoundly influenced by the genre and the mythos H.P. Lovecraft created eight decades ago. Lovecraft’s themes of cosmic indifference, minds invaded by the alien, and the horrors of history – written with a pervasive atmosphere of unexplainable dread – are more relevant than ever as we explore the mysteries of a universe in which our planet is infinitesimal and climatic change is overwhelming it. A few years ago, New Cthulhu : The Recent Weird presented some of the best of this new Lovecraftian fiction from the first decade of the twenty-first century. Now, New Cthulhu 2: More Recent Weird brings you more eldritch tales and even fresher fiction inspired by Lovecraft.

CONTENTS:
The Same Deep Waters As You • Brian Hodge
Mysterium Tremendum • Laird Barron
The Transition of Elizabeth Haskings • Caitlín R. Kiernan
Bloom • John Langan
At Home With Azathoth • John Shirley
The Litany of Earth • Ruthanna Emrys
Necrotic Cove • Lois Gresh
On Ice • Simon Strantzas
The Wreck of the Charles Dexter Ward • Elizabeth Bear & Sarah Monette
All My Love, A Fishhook • Helen Marshall
The Doom That Came to Devil Reef • Don Webb
Momma Durtt • Michael Shea
They Smell of Thunder • W.H. Pugmire
The Song of Sighs • Angela Slatter
Fishwife • Carrie Vaughn
In the House of the Hummingbirds • Silvia Moreno-Garcia
Who Looks Back? • Kyla Ward
Equoid • Charles Stross
The Boy Who Followed Lovecraft • Marc Laidlaw

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CONTENTS: Blood Sisters: Vampire Stories by Women

bloodsiscoverBlood Sisters: Vampire Stories by Women
Edited by Paula Guran
Paperback: 448 pages
Publisher: Night Shade Books (May 5, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1597808180
ISBN-13: 978-1597808187

Contents (in alphabetical order by author):

• Kelley Armstrong, “Learning Curve”
• Elizabeth Bear, “Needles”
• Holly Black, “The Coldest Girl in Coldtown”
• Pat Cadigan, “The Power and the Passion”
• Suzy McKee Charnas, “Unicorn Tapestry”
• Nancy A. Collins, “Vampire King of the Goth Chicks”
• Storm Constantine, “Where the Vampires Live”
• Jewelle Gomez, “October 1927”
• Laurell K. Hamilton, “Selling Houses”
• Lisa L. Hannett, “From the Teeth of Strange Children”
• Charlaine Harris, “Tacky”
• Nancy Holder, “Blood Freak”
• Nalo Hopkinson, “Greedy Choke Puppy”
• Tanya Huff, “This Town Ain’t Big Enough”
• Caitlín R. Kiernan, “Shipwrecks Above”
• Nancy Kilpatrick, “In Memory of…”
• Tanith Lee, “La Dame”
• Angela Slatter, “Sun Falls”
• Lucy Snyder, “Magdala Amygdala
• Hannah Strom-Martin, “Father Peña’s Last Dance”
• Melanie Tem, “The Better Half”
• Catherynne M. Valente, “In the Future When All’s Well”
• Carrie Vaughn, “A Princess of Spain”
• Freda Warringron, “The Fall of the House of Blackwater”
• Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, “Renewal”

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Forthcoming Projects from Paula Guran

OR, Why the Baby Grand Piano OUTSIDE My Office Looks Like This
(You don’t want to see the office…)

(Listed by publication date)
(Updated 5 March 2014)

pianoNew Cthulhu 2: More Recent Weird (Prime: April 2015)
Many of the best weird fiction writers (and creators in most other media) have been profoundly influenced by the genre and the mythos H.P. Lovecraft created eight decades ago. Lovecraft’s themes of cosmic indifference, minds invaded by the alien, and the horrors of history—written with a pervasive atmosphere of unexplainable dread—are more relevant than ever as we explore the mysteries of a universe in which our planet is infinitesimal and climatic change is overwhelming it. A few years ago, New Cthulhu: The Recent Weird presented some of the best of this new Lovecraftian fiction from the first decade of the twenty-first century. Now, New Cthulhu 2: More Recent Weird brings you more eldritch tales and even fresher fiction from the last five years inspired by Lovecraft.

Mermaids and Other Mysteries of the Deep (Prime: May 2015)
The sea is full of mysteries and rivers shelter the unknown. Dating back to ancient Assyria, folkloric tales of mermaids, sirens, rusalka, nymphs, selkies, and other seafolk are found in many cultures, including those of Europe, Africa, the Near East and Asia. Dangerous or benevolent, seductive or sinister—modern masters of fantasy continue to create new legends of these creatures that enchant and entertain us more than ever. Gathered here are some of the finest of these stories. Immerse yourself in this wonderful—and sometimes wicked—watery world!

Blood Sisters: Vampire Stories by Women (Night Shade: May 2015)
Bram Stoker was hardly the first author—male or female—to fictionalize the folkloric vampire, but he defined the modern icon when Dracula appeared in 1897. Since then, many have reinterpreted the ever-versatile vampire over and over again—and female writers have played vital roles in proving the vampire, as well as our perpetual fascination with it, is truly immortal. These authors have devised some of the most fascinating, popular, and entertaining of our many vampiric variations: suavely sensual… fascinating but fatal… sexy and smart… undead but prone to detection… tormented or terrifying… amusing or amoral… doomed or deadly… badass and beautiful… cutting-edge or classic… Blood Sisters collects a wide range of fantastical stories from New York Times bestsellers, critically acclaimed writers, and new voices, all of whom have left their indelible and unique stamps on the vampire genre.

The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror, 2015 Edition (Prime: July 2015)
Now in its fifth year, this annual anthology collects some of the best stories of the previous year with a wide-ranging definition of the dark and weird.

The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Novellas, 2015 Edition (Prime: August 2015)
The novella—probably best defined as a very long short story or a short novel—has long held a special place in science fiction and fantasy. From Isaac Asimov’s Nightfall to Anne McCaffrey’s “Dragonrider” to James Tiptree, Jr.’s “Houston, Houston, Do You Read” to George R. R. Martin’s “Blood of the Dragon” to Brandon Sanderson’s “The Emperor’s Soul,” novellas have represented some of the best work in these genres. With what we hope to be a new annual series, we’ll be spotlighting the best new work of novella length we can find.

Warrior Women (Prime: October 2015)
From fantastic legends and science fictional futures, tales of powerful women—or those who discover strength they did not know they possesses—to fight for what they believe in, for those who they love, simply to survive, or to glory in battle itself. Fierce or fearful, they are courageous and honorable—occasionally unscrupulous and tainted—but all warriors worthy of the name.

Beyond the Woods: Retold Fairy Tales (Night Shade: January 2016-?)
Once upon a time, fairy tales were told aloud for audiences that included both adults and children. Later, individuals shaped the older oral traditions into literary works. Eventually sanitized into what was considered suitable versions for children, adults mostly disdained them as mere nursery fodder. Then—in the late twentieth century—while still existing in prose and cinematic forms intended for youngsters, fairy tales re-emerged in retellings for adults. It doesn’t take fairy-tale magic for outstanding modern authors to transform traditional fairy tales into stories that remain somewhat familiar while still being fresh, original, and more relevant (and sometimes even darker) than ever… it just takes the wizardry of talent and imagination. Now and forever after, enjoy the enchantments of these kings and queens of modern mythic fiction and the spellbinding sorceries of emerging talents assembled herein.

Mammoth Book of the Mummy (Constable-Robinson/UK: February 2016; Running Press/US: April 2016)
In ancient belief, mummification allowed an individual to live forever… and stories about them have existed as long as the dead have been preserved this way. Many past anthologies featuring mummy fiction resurrected the same compendium of dusty old Victorian and pulp stories. Now we have compiled a tomb tome full of thrills, chills, adventure, magic, mystery, and mummymania drawn from more recent writerly imaginations. Join us as we explore a truly mammoth variety of tales that bring new life to an old icon.

Mammoth Book of Cthulhu: New Lovecraftian Fiction (All original, Constable-Robinson/UK: April 2016; Running Press/US: June 2016)
H.P. Lovecraft’s dark vision of humankind’s insignificant place in a vast, uncaring cosmos is not only the foundation of weird fiction but has become part of twenty-first century culture from popular music to gaming to film. These all-original stories—from both established award-winning authors and fresh voices—are inspired by Lovecraft, but do not imitate him: they re-imagine, re-energize, and renew the best of his concepts to create new fiction that explores and indelibly portrays our modern fears and nightmares.

Because someone is sure to ask… Do I need stories submitted for any of these?

Yes and no. Here’s the rundown (Updated 5 March 2014):

New Cthulhu 2: Although I have not contacted all authors, I have a very good idea of the contents. However, if you want to recommend a “new Lovecraftian” story to reprint from 2010-2015—not written by yourself—email paula@prime-books.com, subject: CTHULHU 2.

Mermaids and Other Mysteries of the Deep: Research on this reprint anthology is almost done and I will be asking for permission to reprint stories from a number of authors. I don’t want to be inundated with a lot more, so, again, if you want to recommend a story, that’s great, but I’m not sure I need submissions at this time. Email paula@prime-books.com, subject: MERMAIDS.

Blood Sisters: Vampire Stories by Women: Content complete, contracts out. Will announce the ToC tomorrow if I remember.

The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror, 2015 Edition: Always reading for this up to December 1 or so. But if you have material to submit, I’d suggest you get it in quickly—especially late-in-the-year publications! See submissions call here.

Mammoth Book of Cthulhu: New Lovecraftian Fiction: As this is all-original, authors have been solicited and are turning in stories now.

The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Novellas: Still need material to review—especially SF. And, remember, I’m looking for fantasy that is not particularly dark. See call for submissions here.

Warrior Women: I have a lot of stories already in mind as I was going to do this one several years ago, but would be happy to see other material I can reprint, SF or F. Recommend or submit: paula@prime-books.com, subject: WARRIORS

Beyond the Woods: Retold Fairy Tales: Theme is specific to RETOLD tales. Again, I have I lot of material at hand, but am especially looking for stories published online. Recommend or submit by December 15: guran@literaryservice.com, subject: RETOLD

Mammoth Book of the Mummy: Cross-genre. I’ve written a couple of encyclopedia articles on mummy literature, so I have a lengthy list of material to (pun intended) dig up. This is primarily a reprint anthology, so if you have previously published material, this one is a “maybe”. (And, yes, I am well aware of The Book of the Dead, edited by Jared Shurin from Jurassic London. I will be asking several of the authors for permission to reprint. Jared encouraged me to do this project, so we’re cool!) For the few originals, I have some solicitations out, but if you have special expertise and/or know me, you might contact me. Recommend or submit by December 30: guran@literaryservice.com, subject MUMMY.

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Looking for some great Halloween reads?

ZombiesMoreRecent-200Zombies: More Recent Dead‘s first review at Thinking About Books. Each story is covered, but, in sum:

“Here was I thinking the zombie story was dead and buried, only to find this anthology full of stories of such range and quality… There’s still good work being done on old and trusted tropes… I can now shamble forward to seek out more stories such as this for intellectual nourishment. Zombies: More Recent Dead is great value for money.”

Or there’s the annual The Best Dark Fantasy & Horror of the Year: 2014 (from Kirkus):

YBDarkF&H2014cover300“Editor Paula Guran gives her take on the year’s best dark fantasy and horror in this collection, which boasts 32 stories by such talent as Elizabeth Bear, Joe R. Lansdale, Yoon Ha Lee, Ken Liu, Helen Marshall, Sarah Monette, Kit Reed, Brandon Sanderson, Karin Tidbeck and more. The beauty of an anthology like this—besides being the best picks by an editor who knows her stuff—is the diversity of the genre that it reflects. You’ll find stories here spanning all corners of the horror spectrum, guaranteeing that there’s something you’re looking for as well as new discoveries waiting to be found.”

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ToC and Cover Reveal: TIME TRAVEL: RECENT TRIPS

TimeTravel-300

Time Travel: Recent Trips
Edited by Paula Guran
Trade Paperback | 384 pages | $16.95
Prime Books (October 8, 2014)
ISBN-13: 978-1607014348
(Also will be available in ebook)

The idea of time travel has been with us since ancient times; now the concept of time travel seems . . . almost . . . plausible. Today, tales of chrononauts are more imaginative and thought-provoking than ever before: new views, cutting-edge concepts, radical notions of paradox and possibility—state-of-the-art speculative stories collected from those written in the twenty-first century. Forward to the past, back to the future—get ready for some fascinating trips!

CONTENTS (Alphabetically by author):
“The Time Travel Club,” Charlie Jane Anders
“Mating Habits of the Late Cretaceous,” Dale Bailey
“The Carpet Beds of Sutro Park,” Kage Baker
“The Ile of Dogges,” Elizabeth Bear & Sarah Monette
“The Ghosts of Christmas,” Paul Cornell
“Thought Experiment,” Eileen Gunn
“First Flight,” Mary Robinette Kowal
“Blue Ink,”Yoon Ha Lee
“The Man Who Ended History: A Documentary,” Ken Liu
“The Lost Canal,” Michael Moorcock
“The Mists of Time,” Tom Purdom
“September at Wall and Broad,” Kristine Kathryn Rusch
“Two Shots from Fly’s Photo Gallery,” John Shirley
“With Fate Conspire,” Vandana Singh
“Twember,” Steve Rasnic Tem
“Bespoke,” Genevieve Valentine
“The King of Where-I-Go,” Howard Waldrop
“Number 73 Glad Avenue,” by Suzanne J. Willis

Cover art: Julie Dillion

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MAGIC CITY: RECENT SPELLS

MagicCity-300

Just a reminder MAGIC CITY: RECENT SPELLS is out and has been a few weeks. Have you nought yours yet?

As an editor, I try not to complain much about anything readers say or do. Everyone is entitled to an opinion. But I have to admit I am getting very tired of people who complain an anthology like this is…SHOCK!…all reprints. It is made plain by the description on the book that these are some of the best stories from recent years on the theme. And yes, you may have read a few of them before. But I can bet that the average reader has not read ALL of the two dozen included, not even the majority.

On the positive side, more perspicacious readers seem to delight in finding “new” (to them) authors to make note of. And maybe contented readers don’t post as much as those who aren’t.

Before you think I’m being a little too cranky here…there are complaints every time a “year’s best” comes out! OMG, it’s a book of some of the outstanding stories from the year before and readers are complaining they are reprints? Yes, they do. Oy.

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